Architecture

The Architecture Program concentrates on the built environment. The curriculum visualizes architecture as a cultural, creative, and technical practice and discipline with direct social impact. A balance of architectural, art and technical design courses provides students with a diverse foundation of knowledge in the fields of architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, CAD, and CGI which prepares them for transfer and/or certificates for careers in a wide range of fields.

Faculty

NameOffice Room NumberPhoneEmail
Fernandes, Richard PC 306626-914-8734rfernandes@citruscollege.edu

Contact Information

Division
Career, Technical and Continuing Education
Dean
Dr. James Lancaster
Administrative Secretary
Lois Bottari
Division Office
TE 147
Division Phone Number
626-852-6402

This discipline prepares students to do the following:

  • Describe effective architectural, Computer Generated Imagery (CGI) and drafting techniques including graphic communication of design and technical drawings, orientation of design and technical drawings, and the decision making process for design and technical drawings.
  • Estimate time, material, labor and equipment required for this expertise.
  • Demonstrate planning techniques and administration of architectural, Computer Generated Imagery (CGI) and document control for design and technical working drawings.
  • Prepare for the rigors of research required by a four-year institution through research assignments, slide identification, and museum papers.
  • Recognize how society world views influence visual arts and art history traditions in order to demonstrate an individual’s ability to draw conclusions based upon philosophical considerations and an understanding of how one can influence his/her immediate community, increase awareness of one’s personal impact upon that community, and the documentation of findings.
  • Implement current computer software as tools to further  the creation of art and utilization of the Internet as a research and broadcast vehicle for the reinforcement, development, application and/or improvement of computer related and research skills.
  • Demonstrate competency in all levels of visual arts and art history from introductory to advanced.

ARCH 100
Introduction to Architecture and Environmental Design Foundations
3 Units (AA/AS; CSU)
54 lecture hours
Equivalent to: DRAF 150

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Strongly recommended: ENGL 099 if required by English placement exam or if required by English level.

An introductory course for students interested in exploring the fields of architecture, environmental design, architectural technology and developing a working knowledge of planning and design. Introducing architecture and environmental design majors to design fundamentals, stressing a basic vocabulary of 2-D and 3-D design and design process in an atmosphere of discovery and creativity. Introduction to the examination of aesthetic, symbolic, and cultural elements.


ARCH 102
Visual Communication
2.5 Units (AA/AS; CSU)
36 lecture hours, 36 lab hours
Equivalent to: DRAF 102, DRAF 158

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Strongly recommended: DRAF 101; ENGL 099 if required by English placement exam or if required by English level.

Visual communication of 2-D and 3-D forms and functions are explored using sketching, drawing, and 2-D and 3-D software. Using 2-D and 3-D software, natural and man-made forms are analyzed. Color and texture of form are studied as they are revealed by light, shade, and shadow. Students' perceptions of subject matter are translated into convincing visual expressions by learning the graphic skills and the use of a variety of media. Students sketch, draw and render projects.


ARCH 110
Introduction to Design Fundamentals and Communication
4 Units (AA/AS; CSU)
54 lecture hours, 54 lab hours
Equivalent to: DRAF 151

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Strongly recommended: ARCH 100; ENGL 099 if required by English placement exam or if required by English level.

Introduction to architectural design fundamentals, stressing a basic vocabulary of 2-D and 3-D design and design process in an atmosphere of discovery and creativity. Projects will focus on perception, visualization, representation, and expression as well as an introduction to the examination of aesthetic, symbolic, and cultural elements. Students analyze and apply architectural theory, principles, techniques and model making. The course includes an examination of presentation types and how they can be utilized to communicate architectural ideas.


ARCH 111
Foundation Design
4 Units (AA/AS; CSU)
54 lecture hours, 54 lab hours
Equivalent to: DRAF 152

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 110.

Strongly recommended: DRAF 101.

An introduction to the processes of design through studio projects addressing the role of process in the development of form. The course focuses on drawing and model construction as a means to seeing and understanding. The course includes exploration of the design process and the formal and spatial language of architecture as well as use of case studies. This course provides students with a analysis of material applications and the fundamental knowledge of methods of construction.


ARCH 200
Portfolio Preparation
3 Units (AA/AS; CSU)
45 lecture hours, 36 lab hours
Equivalent to: DRAF 149

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Strongly recommended: ARCH 110 & ARCH 111 or ART 111 & ART 120; ENGL 099 if required by English placement exam or if required by English level.

A course for students to develop individual student portfolios. Development of portfolios will include architectural Computer Generated Imagery (CGI), multimedia, other design technology techniques, free hand drawing, 2D-3D art and rendering. Students will develop knowledge of how to interview in various design professions.


ARCH 201
Architectural Design I
4 Units (AA/AS; CSU; UC)
54 lecture hours, 54 lab hours
Equivalent to: DRAF 153

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 110.

Exploration of design and architectural basic elements. Develop the process of architectural design with an emphasis on two and three dimensional communication techniques. Basic design exercises focusing on simple buildings and their relationship to site and program. Explores the tools required to begin the formulation of design concepts and structure. This exploration is supported by discussion, observations, and hands-on experimentation, including research of precedents. The goal is to develop a process of design that draws from many sources in order to solidify a concept. Craftsmanship, clarity, and eloquence are highly valued in the construction of design submittals and in written and verbal presentations. A portfolio of the assigned design exercises completes the course requirements.


ARCH 202
Architectural Design II
4 Units (AA/AS; CSU; UC)
36 lecture hours, 72 lab hours
Equivalent to: DRAF 154

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 110.

Strongly recommended: DRAF 101.

Basic design exercises focus on buildings and their relationship to site and design process using simple programs, the influence of context, introducing sustainability and environmental constraints. Students analyze and incorporate environmental site factors, simple program requirements and basic knowledge of building materials. The design process of sustainability, climate and lighting issues are incorporated as integral components of an architectural design solution. A portfolio of the assigned design exercises completes the course requirements.


ARCH 242
Building Construction
3 Units (AA/AS; CSU)
54 lecture hours, 18 lab hours

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Prerequisite(s): ARCH 110.

Strongly recommended: ENGL 099 if required by English placement exam or if required by English level.

An overview of construction, building components, and systems investigated through case studies. Explore architectural basic construction materials, methods of construction, properties, assembly and fabrication. Examine various architecture by focusing on its building materials and structural systems as they relate to design concepts. Review the basic types of governmental regulatory constraints that architects must understand to design a building. Analyze structural forces affecting buildings. Examine in depth the sequential processes of constructing a building.


ARCH 250
History of Architecture: Prehistory to Mannerism
3 Units (AA/AS; CSU; IGETC 3A; IGETC 3B; UC; CSUGE C1; CSUGE C2; Citrus GE)
54 lecture hours

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Strongly recommended: ENGL 099 if required by English placement exam or if required by English level.

Development of architecture from Prehistory, ancient Egypt, ancient Greece, Rome to the Mannerism period. Influence of geography, religion and socio-economic movements on architecture are explored. The role of a built environment in social, cultural, and political life: how buildings are constructed, what they mean, effects they have on the world, and ways they imagine new futures and shape private and public life. This course spotlights new possibilities for shaping the world in which we live, with an emphasis on how architecture extends to cities, roads, books and films. Consideration is given to historical context and cultural genealogy of particular buildings and environments, material and economic conditions of buildings and more.


ARCH 251
History of Architecture: Baroque to the Present Day
3 Units (AA/AS; CSU; IGETC 3A; IGETC 3B; UC; CSUGE C1; CSUGE C2; Citrus GE)
54 lecture hours

Grade Mode: Standard Letter

Strongly recommended: ENGL 099 if required by English placement exam or if required by English level.

Exploration of the role of a built environment in social, cultural, and political life: how buildings are constructed, what they mean, effects they have on the world, and ways they imagine new futures and shape private and public life. This course spotlights a series of contemporary case studies for what each reveals about new possibilies for shaping the world in which we live, with an emphasis on how architecture extends to cities, roads, books and films. Consideration is given to historical context and cultural genealogy of particular buildings and environments, material and economic conditions of building, and more.